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Nerelle Que Moffitt, Communications and Outreach Coordinator

Nerelle Que Moffitt

Nerelle Que Moffitt, Communications and Outreach Coordinator.

Nerelle Que Moffitt: A Day in the Life Donut chart showing the typical work duties of Nerelle Que Moffitt, Communications and Outreach Coordinator. Writing Pink chart segment spanning 30% of the whole: the percentage of time Nerelle Que Moffitt spends on Writing Coordinating the ATN Green chart segment spanning 30% of the whole: the percentage of time Nerelle Que Moffitty spends on Coordinating the ATN Program Planning Blue chart segment spanning 25% of the whole: the percentage of time Nerelle Que Moffitt spends on Program Planning Collaborating and Working with Partners Yellow chart segment spanning 15% of the whole: the percentage of time Nerelle Que Moffitt spends on Collaborating and Working with Partners Daily Duties

Donut chart showing how Nerelle Que Moffitt, Communications and Outreach Coordinator, spends her time.

Nerelle works as a communications and outreach coordinator at the National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa. This sanctuary, part of the National Marine Sanctuary System, is responsible for helping to protect and preserve the resources within its boundaries. It has a rich historical and cultural heritage representing more than 3,000 years of human history. It is also home to over 150 species of coral and thousands of animals and plant species. NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries (ONMS) focuses on supporting research on marine sanctuaries and provides science-based data needed to make meaningful management decisions.

What are your basic job duties?

My duties look different on any given day. Some of the things I do include designing and implementing new and ongoing improvements to the visitor center exhibits and outreach materials such as fact sheets, presentations, video and photo media, and more. I work with our internal team and collaborate with external partners to share our programs with a diverse public audience. I also handle our social media, track our community engagement, and assist our science and education teams with outreach programs or events. It’s a lot, but it’s a good time!

How did you get to where you are now in your career?

My career has been anything but a straight line, and I believe it’s made me more passionate about what I do today. After I got my bachelor’s degree in business administration and marketing, I tried doing sales marketing jobs and realized I needed more personal meaning out of my career. I came home to American Samoa, worked at the Department of Commerce for a few years as an economic planner, and grew my experience in local government and community-based projects. I later moved to the private sector and worked in marketing, designing graphics, and engaging with the public through community sponsorships. During this time, I went on adventures every weekend and rediscovered the natural beauty surrounding my island home. I felt my values aligned whenever I learned and shared information about sustainability, the environment, and science. When I heard about the position at National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa, I knew this was the perfect opportunity to positively impact myself and my community.

Was there a time when you felt your work was rewarding or exciting?

Within my first year at NOAA National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa, I hit the road running. I completed a fautasi (Samoan longboat canoe) maritime heritage project, relating it to our local sanctuaries’ cultural heritage. This project included working with partners to co-host an inaugural fautasi maritime heritage symposium, designing an exhibit at the Tauese P.F. Sunia Ocean Center about fautasi, and printing the first magazine publication on the history of fautasi in American Samoa. This project took many long and painstaking hours of research that involved digging up old newspapers and compiling all the information in a way that made the information easy to understand and appealing! This was not a typical science project, but it was so meaningful because it was rooted in Samoan cultural context and is a living practice even today.

  • Name: Nerelle Que Moffitt
  • Location: American Samoa
  • Education: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Marketing
  • National Ocean Service Program Office: Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa

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Last updated:
01/20/23

Author: NOAA

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