Deepwater Horizon Response Image Gallery

  • Pom Pom Clean-Up
    Pom-Pom Clean-Up
    Following manual cleanup at Fourchon Beach, La., on May 27, 2010, booms made out of pom-poms are set to protect the sandy beach area. Plastic pom-poms are effective and low-cost tools that attract and hold oil. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil at Pass a Loutre, La.
    Oil at Pass a Loutre, La.
    Emulsified oil remains on, and pooled below, vegetation in Pass a Loutre, La., following a previous week's storm. Image shot on May 22, 2010. Credit: NOAA.



  • Gulf Islands National Seashore


  • South Pass 'Bathtub Ring'
    South Pass 'Bathtub Ring'
    Typical oiling in wetland areas on May 21, 2010, near the mouth of South Pass, La. Here, the oil forms a 'bathtub ring' marking the high tide line from a previous week's storm tide. Credit: NOAA.



  • South Pass beach, La.
    South Pass beach, La.
    Oiling along South Pass beach, La., on May 21, 2010. A clean-up crew is visible in the background. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil in Perdido Bay
    Oil in Perdido Bay
    Evidence of oiling extends well into Perdido Bay, Ala. This image shows oil along the northern shoreline of the Bay on June 23, 2010. Credit: NOAA.



  • Cleanup in Perdido Bay
    Cleanup in Perdido Bay
    Cleanup crews at work just North of the entrance into Perdido Bay, Ala., on June 23, 2010. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil on Grand Isle, La.
    Oil on Grand Isle, La.
    Oil and tarballs along the beach on Grand Isle, La. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil on Grand Isle, La.
    Oil on Grand Isle, La.
    A closeup of weathered, emulsified oil located in an intertidal area on Grand Isle, La. Credit: NOAA.



  • Shrunken Styrofoam Cups
    Shrunken Styrofoam Cups
    At the end of a Sept. 2010 mission on board the NOAA Ship Pisces, researchers attached a few styrofoam cups to the CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) device prior to lowering it into the water. Since the pressure at the depths of the CTD casts is much greater than at the surface, the air is squeezed out of the air pockets in the styrofoam, compressing the cup to about a quarter of its original size.

    Mission scientists said that their research seems to indicate that the same pressure that causes the cups to shrink has also played a role in the fate of the natural gas that was emitted with the oil from BP's Macondo well. While natural gas is lighter than water and might be expected to rise to the surface, it seems that the enormous pressure of the 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) of water above the well exerts enough force to cause much of the natural gas to dissolve into the deep ocean instead. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Testing for Dissolved Oxygen
    Testing for Dissolved Oxygen
    Scientist Kevin Mouyard performs a Winkler titration to analyze a water sample for dissolved oxygen during a Sept. 2010 mission on board the NOAA Ship Pisces. A titration is a technique where you add a chemical that will react with the substance in the sample you want to measure. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Delivering Water Samples
    Delivering Water Samples
    NOAA Ship Pisces crew members take a small boat to shore to deliver water samples during a Sept. 2010 mission to look for chemicals in the water that would indicate the presence of natural gas and oil, as well as the dilution and decomposition of these products. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • CTD Profile
    CTD Profile
    Tamara Bryant and Molly Redmond, researchers from the University of California at Santa Barbara, examine a CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) profile during a Sept. 2010 mission on board the NOAA Ship Pisces. A CTD is a device that detects how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • CTD sampling
    CTD sampling
    John Kessler, chief scientist for a recent mission aboard the NOAA Ship Pisces, extracts a water sample from a CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth). The CTD device detects how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Bottles mounted on the rosette are also used to collect water samples at different depths. Kessler is an Assistant Professor of Oceanography at Texas A&M. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Testing for Methane
    Testing for Methane
    Lindsay Werra, a scientist from the University of California Santa Barbara, injects a sample into a gas chromatograph to analyze the sample for methane during a Sept. 2010 mission on board the NOAA Ship Pisces. Researchers use a syringe to extract air — into which the methane in the water is released — from the "head" space (the area of air between the surface of the liquid in the sample container and its seal) and then inject it into the chromatograph, which provides a read out of the amount of methane in the sample. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Gas Chromatography
    Gas Chromatography
    Stephani Shusta, a scientist from the University of California Santa Barbara, uses gas chromatography to test a water sample for methane on board the NOAA Ship Pisces during a Sept. 2010 mission. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Sampling for Methane
    Sampling for Methane
    Molly Redmond, a scientist from the University of California Santa Barbara, checks for bubbles in a sample of water on board the NOAA Ship Pisces during a Sept. 2010 mission. The sample will be analyzed for methane. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Erik Quiroz adding chemicals to water sample
    Dissolved Oxygen Water Sample
    Erik Quiroz, a Texas A&M University scientist, adds chemicals to a water sample that will be analyzed for dissolved oxygen on board the NOAA Ship Pisces during a Sept. 2010 mission. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Stephanie Mendes looking at water sample
    Checking a Water Sample
    Stephanie Mendes, a researcher from the University of California at Santa Barbara, checks a water sample for air bubbles on board the NOAA Ship Pisces during a Sept. 2010 mission. Scientists collected water samples to analyze them for chemicals that would indicate the presence of natural gas and oil, as well as the dilution and decomposition of these products. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • Dolphins Off the Bow
    Dolphins Off the Bow
    A pod of dolphins rides the bow wave of the NOAA Ship Pisces at the beginning of a 10-day mission in September, 2010, as the ship departed Pascagoula, Mississippi. The Pisces mission focused on locating submerged natural gas that was emitted with the oil. Visit the Pisces online mission log for more details about the voyage. Credit: NOAA.



  • decontamination facility
    Decontamination Facility
    A BP decontamination facility in the Pascagoula River, MS. Credit: NOAA.



  • Beach Cleanup
    Front-end loaders scrape away clean sand to find oiled areas along the beach at Gulf Shores, Ala. Credit: NOAA.



  • Beach Cleanup
    In Gulf Shores, Ala., BP-funded contractors clean beaches of oil released during the Deepwater Horizon spill. Credit: NOAA.



  • Beach Cleanup
    In Gulf Shores, Ala., a BP-funded contractor shovels and sifts sand to clean the beach of tarballs and other oil residue released during the Deepwater Horizon spill. Credit: NOAA.



  • Return to the Gulf
    Return to the Gulf
    A Kemp's Ridley turtle swims away following release off Cedar Key, Florida. Many sea turtles were recently returned to the Gulf following rehabilitation from oil exposure resulting from the Deepwater Horizon/BP spill. Credit: NOAA.



  • Return to the Gulf
    Return to the Gulf
    Sea World staff releasing a rehabilitated Kemp's Ridley turtle off Cedar Key, Florida. Credit: NOAA.



  • Return to the Gulf
    Return to the Gulf
    National Incident Commander Adm. Thad Allen and NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco releasing two rehabilitated Kemp's Ridley turtles off Cedar Key, Florida. Credit: NOAA.



  • Kemp's Ridley turtle
    Turtles Returned to Gulf
    Kemp's Ridley turtles are returned to the Gulf for release off Cedar Key, Florida, following rehabilitation from oil exposure resulting from the Deepwater Horizon/BP spill. Credit: NOAA.



  • BBC Documentary
    BBC Documentary
    Charlie Henry (far left, seated), NOAA's Lead Scientific Support Coordinator for the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, demonstrates NOAA's 'Geoplatform' to a BBC film crew. Geoplatform is an online tool that provides near-real time response effort data. The BBC is producing a documentary about the spill, highlighting science and engineering involved in response efforts. Credit: NOAA.



  • Seafood Safety Discussion
    Seafood Safety Discussion
    NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco conducted a live online video chat from the White House on Aug. 16 where she answered questions submitted by the public about seafood safety in the Gulf of Mexico following the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill. Credit: NOAA.



  • Natural Resources Damage Assessment
    Natural Resources Damage Assessment
    Standing on an oiled marsh island, BP consultants Bob Nalon (left) and Charlie Johnson discuss field observations with NOAA's Natural Resources Damage Assessment team lead Rich Takacs (on boat, left). Chris Grant (on boat, right), a consultant representing the State of Louisiana, uses a pole to check for oil in the marsh island's sediment. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oiled Boom
    Oiled Boom
    A boom rests on a marsh island that shows signs of heavy oiling. This boom originally was in the water, but was likely driven onto the island by storm waves and wind. A boom is a floating device used to contain oil on a body of water. Credit: NOAA.



  • Media Learn About Damage Assessment Process
    Media Learn About Damage Assessment Process
    On July 15, NOAA hosted media to demonstrate the Natural Resources Damage Assessment process for the Deepwater Horizon / BP oil spill. Here, NOAA Environmental Scientist and NRDA trustee Tom Brosnan explains various techniques and tools that will be employed once the NRDA team reaches designated field sites along the Gulf Coast. NBC News Producer Stephen Wende checks his camera in background. Credit: NOAA.



  • Towing Clean Boom
    Towing Clean Boom
    A boat tows cleaned boom across Barataria Bay to replace soiled boom. A boom is a floating device used to contain oil on a body of water. Credit: NOAA.



  • Natural Resources Damage Assessment Pre-Brief
    Natural Resources Damage Assessment Pre-Brief
    On July 15, NOAA hosted media to demonstrate the Natural Resources Damage Assessment process for the Deepwater Horizon / BP oil spill. Here, NOAA's Rich Takacs, head of a NOAA Natural Resources Damage Assessment team, explains to National Public Radio's Elizabeth Shogren what will take place during the day's expedition in a dockside interview. Credit: NOAA.



  • Media Learn About Damage Assessment Process
    Media Learn About Damage Assessment Process
    On July 15, NOAA hosted a media field trip in Grand Isle, La., to demonstrate the Natural Resources Damage Assessment process for the Deepwater Horizon / BP oil spill. Left to Right: Michael Massimi, Invasive Species Coordinator for Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program; Elizabeth Shogren, Environmental Reporter, NPR; Jim Amoss, Editor, Times Picayune and Chris Grant, Shaw Consulting who represents the state of Louisiana. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA mariners prepare to drop a CTD Rosette
    Preparing for Water Samples
    Betsy Broughton readies a Niskin bottle on a CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) rosette for another deployment onboard the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow. Once the device is lowered into the water on a cable, torpedo-shaped Niskin bottles mounted on the device are used to collect water samples at different depths. Credit: NOAA.



  • David Graves and Regina Easley label water sample bottles.
    Labeling Water Samples
    David Graves and Regina Easley label water sample bottles. The samples were collected using a device called a CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) rosette. Torpedo-shaped bottles mounted on the rosette are used to collect water samples at different depths. Credit: NOAA.



  • Liza Baskin and Ashok Deshpande collect water samples from the CTD.
    Collecting Water Samples
    Liza Baskin and Ashok Deshpande gather water samples from a CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) rosette. The CTD device's primary function is to detect how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Torpedo-shaped bottles mounted on the rosette are used to collect water samples at different depths. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA mariners prepare to drop a CTD Rosette
    Deploying a CTD Rosette
    General Vessel Assistant Carl Coonce and Skilled Fisherman Jon Jarrell deploy a CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) rosette onboard the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow. The Deepwater Horizon site is visible in the background. The CTD device detects how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Bottles mounted on the rosette are also used to collect water samples at different depths. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA mariners prepare to drop a CTD Rosette
    Deploying a CTD Rosette
    Onboard the NOAA Ship Chris Henry Bigelow, Chris Sumner and Tamara Holzworth-Davis prepare a CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) rosette for its first deployment in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon site. The CTD device's primary function is to detect how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Torpedo-shaped bottles mounted on the rosette are used to collect water samples at different depths. Credit: NOAA.



  • During a drill, scientists don survival suits
    'Abondon Ship' Drill
    It's all about teamwork. During an "abandon ship" drill, scientists David Graves and Liza Baskin help Regina Easley don her survival suit onboard the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow. Although it's possible to put the suit on by oneself, it's much easier to have help. Credit: NOAA.



  • Wiper Elliott Mork and Chief Steward Dennis Carey discharge water from the firehose over the side of the ship.
    Fire Drill
    Wiper Elliott Mork and Chief Steward Dennis Carey discharge water from the firehose over the side of the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow. Even though the fire was only a drill, it's still important to charge the hose to ensure the firefighting system works properly and to allow the crew to practice handling a live fire hose. Credit: NOAA.



  • Survey Technician Jim Burkitt leads the fire team to fight a simulated fire
    Fire Drill
    Survey Technician Jim Burkitt takes part in a simulated fire onboard the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow. NOAA ship crews regularly conduct a variety of safety drills while at sea. Credit: NOAA.



  • Scientist demoing how to take air sample
    Air Sample Demo
    Onboard the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow, scientist Lauren Ridley demonstrates the process of taking an air sample for a visiting news crew. Credit: NOAA.



  • Skilled Fisherman Tony Viera serves as lookout onboard the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow
    Careful Transit
    Skilled Fisherman Tony Viera serves as lookout onboard the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow while the vessel transits in the vicinity of other ships and rigs near the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • monitor acoustic data
    Acoustic Monitoring
    Scientist Paul Walline and Survey Technician Jim Burkitt monitor acoustic data being gathered by the NOAA Ship Henry Bigelow. The ship's acoustic gear uses sound waves to detect subsurface material with a different density than water, such as methane gas bubbles from seeps in the ocean floor. The ship is monitoring the Deepwater Horizon wellhead for any possible changes. Credit: NOAA.



  • a turtle
    A Turtle
    Turtle in water near Pascagoula, Mississippi. Credit: NOAA.



  • instruments onboard the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    Instruments Onboard the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    LT Sam Greenway discusses readings from instruments onboard the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson during its mission to search for subsurface oil. Credit: NOAA.



  • Decontaminating Boots
    Boot Decontamination
    Dan Wright decontaminates his boots before walking inside the ship. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil Samples
    Surface Oil Samples
    Surface oil samples taken from the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • Taking an Oil Sample
    Taking an Oil Sample
    ENS Jasmine Cousins lowers a bucket to take a sample of oil from the surface in a heavily oiled area at the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • Cleaning the CTD
    Cleaning the CTD Cable
    Jonathan Anderson sprays the CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) cable before the instrument is brought onboard after taking samples in a heavily oiled area at the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • Helicopter preparing to land
    A Helicopter Prepares to Land
    A helicopter preparing to land on a ship at the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • Water samples being transferred
    Transferring Water Samples
    Water samples are transferred from the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson to the Lady Ione. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil in boat wake at Deepwater Horizon site
    Oil in the Wake
    Oil in the boat wake at the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • National Geographic videographer Bob Perrin films an oil slick at the Deepwater Horizon site
    Filming at Deepwater Horizon Site
    National Geographic videographer Bob Perrin films an oil slick at the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • Fish at Deepwater Horizon site
    Fish at Deepwater Horizon Site
    Fish at the Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • Deepwater Horizon site
    Deepwater Horizon Site
    The Deepwater Horizon site. Credit: NOAA.



  • ENS Joe Carrier preparing an air sample for shipping
    Preparing an Air Sample for Shipping
    ENS Joe Carrier preparing an air sample for shipping. Credit: NOAA.



  • Tar balls float in the water around the CTD rosette
    Tar Balls Floating in the Water
    Tar balls float in the water around the CTD (conductivity, temperature, depth) rosette. The CTD device's primary function is to detect how the conductivity and temperature of the water column changes relative to depth. Credit: NOAA.



  • CDR Shepard Smith is interviewed by National Geographic videographer Bob Perrin
    CDR Shepard Smith
    CDR Shepard Smith is interviewed by National Geographic videographer Bob Perrin. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson in Pascagoula, MS. Credit: NOAA.



  • Deep-draft ocean transporter
    Deep-draft Ocean Transporter
    Deep-draft ocean transporter in the Mississippi River near Venice, LA, being deconned after working out at spill site. Credit: NOAA.



  • seafood inspection
    Seafood Inspection
    Steve Wilson, chief quality officer for NOAA's Seafood Inspection Program, demonstrates sensory analysis of a sample of shrimp on July 8, 2010, at NOAA's National Seafood Inspection Laboratory in Pascagoula. Sensory analysis is a method used to evaluate the smell, look and taste of seafood that is part of the NOAA-FDA program to ensure the safety of seafood from the Gulf of Mexico. Fish samples collected from the Gulf of Mexico by NOAA vessels operating within and outside closed fishing areas are being tested for taint by a panel of sensory analysts at NOAA's National Seafood Inspection Laboratory, and are shipped to Seattle for chemical analysis for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the components of oil, at NOAA's Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Credit: NOAA.



  • seafood inspection
    Seafood Inspection
    Steve Wilson, chief quality officer for NOAA's Seafood Inspection Program, demonstrates sensory analysis of a sample of shrimp on July 8, 2010, at NOAA's National Seafood Inspection Laboratory in Pascagoula. Credit: NOAA.



  • An IOOS glider collects data in the gulf waters.
    A Glider
    An Integrated Ocean Observing System glider collects data in Gulf waters. Credit: NOAA.



  • Staff used a glider to assist in the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill response by locating and tracking oil at various levels in the water column, as well as on the water surface.
    A Glider
    To assist in the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill response, staff used a glider to locate and track oil at various levels in the water column as well as on the water surface. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter deploys a glider to track the oil.
    Gordon Gunter
    Staff on the NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter deploy a glider to track the oil in the Gulf. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship <em>Gordon Gunter</em> aids in the Deepwater Horizon BP spill response effort in the Gulf. Credit: NOAA.
    Gordon Gunter
    NOAA Ship Gordon Gunter aids in the Deepwater Horizon BP spill response effort in the Gulf. Credit: NOAA.



  • Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian and pathologist, works with Jennifer Muller, a biological scientist at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, to examine a dead Kemp's ridley turtle that stranded alive with an oily substance on it, was brought in for rehabilitation, but subseqently died. Credit: NOAA.
    Turtle Necroscopy (Autopsy)
    Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian and pathologist, works with Jennifer Muller, a biological scientist at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, to examine a dead Kemp's ridley turtle that stranded alive with an oily substance on it, was brought in for rehabilitation, but subseqently died. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA's Dr. Brian Stacy carries a dead sea turtle to the table where he will conduct a necropsy.
    Turtle Necroscopy (Autopsy)
    NOAA's Dr. Brian Stacy carries a dead sea turtle to the table where he will conduct a necropsy. Credit: NOAA.



  • Dr. Yonat Swimmer and Dr. T. Todd Jones of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center measure a dead Kemp's ridley sea turtle on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi.
    Documenting Turtle Mortality
    Dr. Yonat Swimmer and Dr. T. Todd Jones of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center measure a dead Kemp's ridley sea turtle on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. Credit: NOAA.



  • Shawn Murakawa and Dr. T. Todd Jones of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center prepare to swab a dead Kemp's ridley sea turtle on a vessel of opportunity in the inshore waters of Mississippi.
    Documenting Turtle Mortality
    Shawn Murakawa and Dr. T. Todd Jones of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center prepare to swab a dead Kemp's ridley sea turtle on a vessel of opportunity in the inshore waters of Mississippi. Credit: NOAA.



  • Shawn Murakawa of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center retrieves a dead Kemp's ridley sea turtle from the inshore waters off Mississippi.
    Documenting Turtle Mortality
    Shawn Murakawa of NOAA's Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center retrieves a dead Kemp's ridley sea turtle from the inshore waters off Mississippi. Credit: NOAA.



  • Jim Jeansonne, NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator on an overflight mission.
    Overflight Mission
    Jim Jeansonne, NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator on an overflight mission. June 25, 2010. Credit: NOAA.



  • Member of U.S. Coast Guard National Strike Force on an overflight mission, observing an airplane spraying dispersant. June 25, 2010.
    Overflight Mission
    Member of U.S. Coast Guard National Strike Force on an overflight mission, observing an airplane spraying dispersant. June 25, 2010. Credit: NOAA.



  • Kemps Ridely Turtle
    Kemps Ridely Turtle
    Turtles brought in to the Audubon Nature Institute distressed and oiled are allowed to recuperate. When the turtles are brought in, they are given toxiban (activated charcoal); their mouths are cleaned with mayonnaise; they are given fluids and antibiotics; and they are cleaned. This image shows a cleaned Kemp's Ridley turtle. Credit: NOAA.



  • loggerhead turtle
    Juvenile Loggerhead Turtle
    A juvenile loggerhead turtle that weighed 136 pounds was rescued distressed and oiled, two days prior to when this photo was taken. When the turtles are brought in to the Audubon Nature Institute by NOAA, they are given toxiban (activated charcoal); their mouths are cleaned with mayonnaise; they are given fluids and antibiotics; and are cleaned. Credit: NOAA.



  • flying the NOAA P3 aircraft
    Flying the NOAA P3 Aircraft
    LT Scott Price flying the NOAA P3 aircraft on a mission to document the pre-oiled Louisiana coast for the emergency response effort on May 29. Credit: NOAA.



  • working on the Thomas Jefferson
    Working on the Thomas Jefferson
    Staff working on the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson after it returned from a mission in the Gulf on May 28. Credit: NOAA.



  • working on the Thomas Jefferson
    Working on the Thomas Jefferson
    Mark Blankenship working on the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson after it returned from a mission in the Gulf on May 28. Credit: NOAA.



  • recovering turtles
    Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    One of 10 Kemp's Ridley turtles recovered by a team of sea turtle experts from NOAA and the University of Florida. The team recovered oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf of Mexico, near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • examining Kemp's Ridley turtle
    Examining a Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian, examines a Kemp's Ridley turtle recovered in the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle
    Oiled Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian, left, and Jennifer Muller, right, of the University of Florida, recover an oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle on June 14. They are part of a team of sea turtle experts from NOAA and the University of Florida working to recover oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • sargassum
    Oil and Sargassum
    Stands of oil float below patches of sargassum, a type of sea plant where an abundance of sea life gathers. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • soaked sargassum
    Oil-soaked Sargassum
    A patch of oil-soaked sargassum (a type of sea plant) where turtles and other sea life gather. Currents move the oil and sargassum in similar patterns. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • recovering turtle
    Recovering Oiled and Endangered Turtles
    A team of sea turtle experts from NOAA and the University of Florida work to recover oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf of Mexico, near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • recovering turtle
    Recovering Oiled and Endangered Turtles
    A team of sea turtle experts from NOAA and the University of Florida work to recover oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf of Mexico, near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • kemp's ridley turtle
    Recovering a Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    Blair Witherington, of Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, recovers an oiled, endangered Kemp's Ridley turtle within 20 miles of the site of the Deepwater Horizon accident. Witherington and a team of sea turtle experts from NOAA and the University of Florida were working to recover oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf of Mexico. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • taking coordinates
    Taking Coordinates
    Blair Witherington, of Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, takes down the coordinates via satellite phone of the "burn box," close to the site of the Deepwater Horizon accident, where he and a team of sea turtle experts from NOAA and the University of Florida will work to recover oiled and endangered turtles in the Gulf of Mexico. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle
    Oiled Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    One of 10 oiled Kemp's Ridley turtles recovered on June 14 by a team of sea turtle experts from NOAA and the University of Florida. The endangered turtle will be treated and transported to a safer habitat. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle
    Oiled Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    One of 10 heavily oiled Kemp's Ridley turtles recovered not far from the site of the Deep Horizon accident site on June 14, 2010. He will be cleaned an treated by a team of sea turtle experts. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle
    Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    One of 10 Kemp's Ridley turtles recovered not far from the site of the Deep Horizon accident site on June 14, 2010. He will be cleaned an treated by a team of sea turtle experts. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle
    Oiled Kemp's Ridley Turtle
    An endangered Kemp's Ridley turtle swims out from under an oil pattie as rescue workers attempt to capture the oiled animal for rehabilitation on June 14, 2010. He was one of the unlucky turtles that got away. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • loggerhead turtle
    Loggerhead Turtle
    A large loggerhead turtle, 6 to 7 years old and over 100 pounds, evades being netted by a team of sea turtle experts while swimming in the polluted waters of the Gulf of Mexico, near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on June 14. He appeared to be in good condition, so the team decided not to capture him. Credit: Carolyn Cole/LA Times.



  • Hydrographic Map
    Digital Terrain
    NOAA's Office of Coast Survey constructed this digital terrain model of the sea floor in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig using multibeam survey data collected during the 1990s. The hydrographic data and model can help experts better understand ocean circulation.



  • Kemps Ridley Turtle
    Cleaning an Endangered Turtle
    Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian, prepares to clean an oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle. Veterinarians and scientists from NOAA, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, and other partners working under the Unified Command are capturing heavily-oiled young turtles 20 to 40 miles offshore as part of ongoing animal rescue and rehabilitation efforts. Credit: NOAA and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.



  • Oiled Turtle
    Oiled Turtle
    Close-up of an oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle captured during a June 1 survey. The turtle was cleaned, provided veterinary care, and taken to the Audubon Aquarium. Efforts continue to assess the condition of these endangered sea turtles and capture turtles caught in heavy oil. Credit: NOAA.



  • Kemps Ridley Turtle
    Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation
    Dr. Brian Stacy, NOAA veterinarian, prepares to clean an oiled Kemp's Ridley turtle. Veterinarians and scientists from NOAA, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, and other partners working under the Unified Command are capturing heavily-oiled young turtles 20 to 40 miles offshore as part of ongoing animal rescue and rehabilitation efforts. Credit: NOAA and Georgia Department of Natural Resources.



  • Surveying oiled sargassum
    Surveying Oiled Sargassum
    Mark Dodd, wildlife biologist from Georgia's Department of Natural Resources, surveying oiled sargassum in the Gulf of Mexico. Credit: Georgia Department of Natural Resources



  • R/V Pisces
    The R/V Pisces
    The R/V Pisces, commissioned on November 6, 2009, is the third of four new Fisheries Survey Vessels to be built by NOAA. Credit: NOAA.



  • R/V Pisces
    Water-sampling Equipment on the R/V Pisces
    Water-sampling equipment used on the R/V Pisces. Credit: NOAA.



  • R/V Pisces
    Longline Winch on the R/V Pisces
    Longline winch on board the R/V Pisces. The longline is used to survey shark and red snapper. Credit: NOAA.



  • Materials for Sensory Training
    Materials for Sensory Training
    Materials used for sensory testing training. The National Marine Fisheries Service Pascagoula lab is conducting training for Gulf State employees to be able to initially screen fish for the presence of petroleum. Credit: NOAA.



  • Materials for Sensory Training
    Materials for Sensory Training
    Materials used for sensory testing training. The National Marine Fisheries Service Pascagoula lab is conducting training for Gulf State employees to be able to initially screen fish for the presence of petroleum. Credit: NOAA.



  • At Work at the BP Training Center
    At Work at the BP Training Center
    NOAA scientists and partners at work in the BP Training Center, Houma, Louisiana. Credit: NOAA.



  • BP Training Center
    BP Training Center
    Mark Pickett, Paul Chamberlain, and Chad Smith in the BP Training Center, Houma, Louisiana. Credit: NOAA.



  • Workers Being Decontaminated
    Workers Being Decontaminated
    Workers being decontaminated after cleaning oiled boom in Port Fourchon, Louisiana. Credit: NOAA.



  • Boom Being De-oiled
    Boom Being De-oiled
    Boom at Port Fourchon, Louisiana, in the process of being de-oiled so that it can be used again. Credit: NOAA.



  • Vessel Decontamination
    Vessel Decontamination
    Workers decontaminating a vessel before it enters Port Fourchon, Louisiana. Credit: NOAA.



  • Maintaining the Snare
    Maintaining the Snare
    Workers "maintaining the snare," or replacing oiled pom-pons with clean pom-pons. Because oil is attracted to and will stick to the pom-pons, pom-pons are one tool used to clean up spilled oil. Credit: NOAA.



  • Replacing Oiled Pom-pons
    Replacing Oiled Pom-pons
    Workers replacing oiled pom-pons with clean ones along a beach in Louisiana. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oiled Boom
    Oiled Boom
    Oiled boom along a beach in Louisiana. The boom will be cleaned so that it can be used again. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oiled Waste
    Oiled Waste
    Oiled waste on the beach in Port Fourchon, Louisiana. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson in port at Port Fourchon, Louisiana, before heading out for its mission. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    Preparing the Thomas Jefferson for Its Mission
    On May 28, Jerry Townsend, Electronics Technician from the Naval Oceanographic Office, briefed reporters aboard the Thomas Jefferson. On June 1, Thomas Jefferson left to sail from New Orleans to conduct sonar surveys, measure water chemistry, and take water samples. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    Preparing the Thomas Jefferson for Its Mission
    Thomas Jefferson crewmember David Miles loads supplies for the vessel's next cruise. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    Preparing the Thomas Jefferson for Its Mission
    On May 28, NOAA personnel prepared the Thomas Jefferson for the vessel's next cruise. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    Preparing the Thomas Jefferson for Its Mission
    On May 28, Thomas Jefferson crewmember Farron Cornell monitors preparations for the vessel's next cruise. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson Preparing for Next Mission
    A crewmember from the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson assists with unloading equipment from the vessel on May 28 in preparation for the ship's next cruise. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson Preparing for Next Mission
    The NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson arrived in New Orleans on May 28 following a five-day mission where it deployed a variety of U.S. Navy ocean monitoring instruments in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill. Data from this mission will aid researchers in monitoring the surface and deep currents that are distributing the oil. On June 1, Thomas Jefferson is scheduled to sail from New Orleans to conduct sonar surveys, measure water chemistry, and take water samples. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson
    The NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson preparing for its mission. Credit: NOAA.



  • Documenting the Condition of Coastal Areas


  • Documenting the Condition of Coastal Areas
    Documenting the Condition of Coastal Areas
    LTJG Matthew Griffin, sensor operator, during a May 29 overflight of the area west of New Orleans to the Texas border. The purpose of the flights is to document the condition of the pre-oiled coast. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil at the Convergence Zone
    Oil at the Convergence Zone
    Photo taken on May 27 near the convergence zone showing dark brown and red emulsion oil. Credit: NOAA.



  • Mobile Overflight
    Mobile Overflight
    Photo captured during an overflight on May 26. Credit: NOAA.



  • Surface Oil Near Pass a Loutre, Louisiana
    Surface Oil Near Pass a Loutre, Louisiana
    Image from an overflight on May 25, approximately 12 miles east of Pass a Loutre, Louisiana, showing dark brown and red emulsion in the convergence zone with dull and silver-colored sheens. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oiled Marsh
    Oiled Marsh
    An oiled marsh seen during an overflight on May 20. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil Near the Spill Source
    Oil Near the Spill Source
    A view of the oil source as seen during an overflight on May 20. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oiled Marsh on Delta
    Oiled Marsh on Delta
    Dark brown oil in marsh seen during an overflight on May 18. Credit: NOAA.



  • Heavy Band of Oil
    Heavy Band of Oil
    Heavy band of oil seen during an overflight on May 12. Credit: NOAA.



  • In Situ Burn Operations
    In Situ Burn Operations
    In situ burn operations on May 10. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil on the North Chandeleur Islands
    Oil on the North Chandeleur Islands
    Example of the oil stranded on the North Chandeleur Islands on May 8. There were four areas with this kind of oiling. The areas were in the range of 100 to 300 meters long and 0.5 to two meters wide, with 25 up to 90 percent distribution of oil less than one centimeter thick of cover. Three of the four areas were on the north sides of the inlets between the islands. Credit: NOAA.



  • Striped Dolphins
    Striped Dolphins
    Striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) observed in emulsified oil on April 29. Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Mission to Study Loop Current
    Dr. Nick Shay, professor of meteorology and physical oceanography at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Research, confers with Richard Henning, the NOAA flight director aboard a NOAA Lockheed WP-3D Orion (N42RF) during the May 21, 2010 mission to study the Loop Current. Credit: NOAA.



  • Deploying Probes to Study Loop Current
    Deploying Probes to Study Loop Current
    Dr. Nick Shay, professor of meteorology and physical oceanography at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Research, and NOAA flight electronics tecnician Bill Olney prepare to deploy an air-launched probe from a NOAA Lockheed WP-3D Orion (N42RF) during the May 21, 2010, mission to study the Loop Current. Credit: NOAA.



  • WP-3D Orion flight
    Loop Current Study
    NOAA flight electronic technicians Mike Mascaro (left) and Bill Olney, aboard a NOAA Lockheed WP-3D Orion flying over the Gulf of Mexico, prepare to launch an airborne probe that measures wind speed and direction, air temperature, and pressure during a study of the Loop Current (May 21, 2010). Credit: NOAA.



  • WP-3D Orion
    NOAA WP-3D Orion Prepares for Flight
    A NOAA Lockheed WP-3D Orion (N42RF) prepares to fly over the Gulf of Mexico on May 21, 2010, to deploy probes that will aid researchers at NOAA and the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Research in monitoring the Loop Current. The aircraft is based at the NOAA Aircraft Operations Center at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla. Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Tar Ball Found on Dauphin Island, Alab.
    A close-up of a tar ball found on the beach in Dauphin Island, Alabama (May 13, 2010). Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Tar Ball Found on Dauphin Island, Alab.
    A close-up of a tar ball found on the beach in Dauphin Island, Alabama (May 13, 2010). Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Overflight Preparation
    Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere Dr. Larry Robinson (middle) prepares for an overflight of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. He is shown here with NOAA Corps pilot Lt. Cdr. Mark Sweeney (foreground) and National Ocean Service Acting Assistant Administrator David Kennedy (May 13, 2010). Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Dauphin Island Tar Balls Investigated
    The Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, Dr. Larry Robinson (standing), and NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator John Whitney investigate tar balls found along the shore on Dauphin Island, Alabama (May 13, 2010). Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Tar Ball Close-up
    A close-up of a tar ball found on the beach in Dauphin Island, Alabama (May 13, 2010). Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Investigating Tar Balls
    From left, Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique (SCAT) team lead Graham McDonald, NOAA Scientific Support Coordinator John Whitney, and Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere Dr. Larry Robinson investigate tar balls washed ashore on the beaches of Dauphin Island, Alabama (May 13, 2010). Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Preflight
    Dr. Larry Robinson, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, meets with the crew of NOAA's King Air aircraft on May 13, 2010, prior to an overflight viewing of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. From left: pilots Lt. Cdr. Mark Sweeney and Lt. Scott Tucker, Dr. Larry Robinson, National Ocean Service Acting Assistant Administrator David Kennedy, aircraft technician Andrew Halbach. Credit: NOAA.



  • Handling Samples
    Handling Samples
    NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco, NOAA Fisheries Assistant Administrator Dr. Eric Schwaab, and Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley assess how the sample is processed aboard the Research Vessel Caretta and chain of custody protocol used when handling specimens associated with the oil spill. Credit: NOAA.



  • Discussion of Sampling Plans
    Discussion of Sampling Plans
    NOAA Fisheries Assistant Administrator Dr. Eric Schwaab and NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco discuss sampling plans for future and ongoing vessel surveys with with Dr. Walter Ingram of the Southeast Fisheries Science Center Pascagoula Lab. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Administrator visits Alabama Lab
    NOAA Administrator Visits Alabama Lab
    On May 7, NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco visited the Richard C. Shelby Center for Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management at Dauphin Island Sea Lab in Alabama. Lab Executive Director Dr. George Crozier, shown here, briefed Lubchenco on ongoing research and monitoring efforts. Credit: NOAA.



  • Oil Spill from Above
    NOAA Administrator Tours Coastal Louisiana
    On May 7, NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco received an aerial tour of coastal Louisiana with Nancy Sutley, chair of the White House Counsel on Environmental Quality. NOAA Corps CAPT Michele Finn coordinated the flight. Here, Lubchenco and Finn discuss the situation after the survey. Credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Mussel Watch: Collecting a Sediment Sample
    NOAA Mussel Watch: Collecting a Sediment Sample
    Scientists use a Van Veen grab (a lightweight sampler designed to take large samples in soft bottoms) to collect sediments for analysis. Photo credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Mussel Watch: Sieving a Sediment Sample
    NOAA Mussel Watch: Sieving a Sediment Sample
    Dr. Terry McTigue, Mussel Watch scientist, holds a sieve to retrieve burrowing animals from a sediment sample. Photo credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Mussel Watch: Collecting Sediment for Analysis
    NOAA Mussel Watch: Collecting Sediment for Analysis
    Dr. Gunnar Lauenstein and Dr. Dennis Apeti use a Van Veen grab to collect sediment for analysis. Photo credit: NOAA.



  • NOAA Mussel Watch: Testing Oysters
    NOAA Mussel Watch: Testing Oysters
    Dr. Dennis Apeti, Mussel Watch scientist, brings up a trawl full of oysters for testing. Photo credit: NOAA.



  • Briefing Governor Bobby Jindal
    Briefing Governor Bobby Jindal
    NOAA Office of Response & Restoration's Ed Levine (far left) and Charlie Henry (third from left) brief Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal (second from right) on April 28, 2010. Photo credit: Nickie Scillo.



  • Dr. Lubchenco Arrives at the JIC
    Dr. Lubchenco Arrives at the Joint Information Center
    NOAA Administrator, Dr. Jane Lubchenco, arrives at the Joint Information Center for the federal BP oil spill response in Robert, Louisiana. John Tarpley, Regional Operations Branch Chief from NOAA's Office of Response and Restoration, briefs Dr. Lubchenco on the situation.



  • Dave Wesley in Overflight
    Dave Wesley in Overflight
    NOAA observer Dave Wesley records data during an overflight in the Gulf of Mexico. Visual observations made by Dave and his colleagues, in the form of maps and verbal briefings, are being passed along to oil spill modelers at NOAA's campus in Seattle. The Seattle modelers use these observations, along with oceanographic data on tides and currents, to predict the trajectory of the oil slick.



  • Scientific Support Coordinator Charlie Henry Explains Trajectory Map
    Scientific Support Coordinator Charlie Henry Explains Trajectory Map
    NOAA provides critical scientific information to the response effort dealing with the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. Here, Charlie Henry, NOAA's on-scene Scientific Support Coordinator, explains an oil trajectory map at an April 29, 2010, press conference. To the left of Henry are Lars Herbst, Minerals Management Service, and Rear Admiral Mary Landry, U.S. Coast Guard. Photo: NOAA.