For More Information

After Sandy: Rebuilding and Recovery

NOS Sandy-related projects and activities

'Before and After' photos of coastal damage from Sandy (Nov. 2012)

After the storm: Collecting Aerial Imagery (podcast)

National Geodetic Survey

NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations

Aerial Photos: Post-Sandy and After Restoration

National Geodetic Survey imagery shows restored areas in New Jersey

Oct. 29, 2013

NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) recently collected imagery and topographic/bathymetric Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data over several New Jersey areas hard-hit by Sandy in 2012. The images will primarily support NOAA nautical chart updates, but will also be used for inundation modeling, coastal zone management and restoration, and as a baseline for future storm impacts and changes in these areas. This latest round of imagery collection follows a series of missions in 2012, during which NGS collected thousands of images of damage along the East Coast immediately following Sandy.

The following are samples of imagery captured shortly after Sandy passed over the Eastern Seaboard and one year later, after these same areas were restored. All images were captured by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey. Move your mouse back and forth over each image to view the comparisons.

Post-Sandy Post-Restoration

Music Pier, Ocean City, New Jersey. The first image shows the area shortly after Sandy passed over the Eastern Seaboard. The second image shows the same area in Sept. 2013 after the completion of restoration activities. Download PDF

Post-Sandy Post-Restoration

Great Egg Harbor Inlet, New Jersey. The first image shows the area shortly after Sandy passed over the Eastern Seaboard. The second image shows the same area in Sept. 2013 after the completion of restoration activities. Download PDF

Post-Sandy Post-Restoration

Margate City, New Jersey. The first image shows the area shortly after Sandy passed over the Eastern Seaboard. The second image shows the same area in Sept. 2013 after the completion of restoration activities. Download PDF

 

leaf

NOAA's National Geodetic Survey is the U.S. government source for precise latitude, longitude, and elevation measurements. The NOAA fleet of ships and aircraft is operated, managed and maintained by the NOAA Office of Marine and Aviation Operations, which includes commissioned officers of the NOAA Corps and civilian wage mariners.

Learn more about our role in rebuilding and restoration in the aftermath of Sandy.