The High Cost of a Littered Beach

NOAA study shows marine debris costs California residents millions of dollars.

Infographic displaying how much a community would save if marine debris was reduced on beachs.

Trash talk

Reducing marine debris by even 25 percent at beaches in and near Orange County, California, could save residents approximately $32 million during the summer by not having to travel long distances to other beaches.

A NOAA-funded Marine Debris Program economics study found that Southern California residents are losing millions of dollars each year by avoiding nearby littered beaches and traveling to beaches that are farther away and cleaner.

The study is the first of its kind to look at how marine debris influences decisions to go to the beach and what it may cost.  It found that having debris on the beach and good water quality are the leading factors in deciding which beach residents visit.  Reducing marine debris by even 25 percent at beaches in and near Orange County, California, could save residents approximately $32 million during the summer by not having to travel long distances to other beaches.

Beach characteristics were collected for 31 popular Southern California public beaches from San Onofre Beach to Zuma Beach.  Orange County residents were also surveyed on their recreation habits, including how many day trips they took to the beach from June - August 2013, where they went, how much it cost them, and which beach characteristics are important to them.

The results provided in an estimate if how much Orange County residents would potentially benefit, including how often they visit beaches and how much they would save in travel costs, over a summer season by reducing marine debris at some or all of these 31 beaches.

The study focused on Orange County because of the number and variety of beaches, their importance to permanent residents, ease of access, and likelihood that marine debris would be present. Researchers believe that, given the results, the study could be modified for assessing similar coastal communities in the United States.

The study was funded by NOAA’s Marine Debris Program and led by Cambridge, Massachusetts-based Industrial Economics Inc. (or IEc).

Search Our Posts
Get Social

More Information

Did you know?

Marine debris injures and kills marine life, interferes with navigation safety, and poses a threat to human health. Our oceans and waterways are polluted with a wide variety of marine debris ranging from soda cans and plastic bags to derelict fishing gear and abandoned vessels.


Contact Us