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NOAA Coastal Services Center

 

MEET: Ray Clark

Contract Specialist, Facilities, NOAA Coastal Services Center

My job involves general maintenance which includes drywall repair; painting; replacement of ceiling tiles; repair and upkeep of facilities lighting; installation of office furniture; the hanging of white boards, bulletin boards, and pictures; scheduled preventive maintenance; and any other maintenance-related work. My job also includes classroom set-ups, scheduling the use of NOAA vehicles, the distribution of mail, keeping a current inventory on consumable supplies, stocking the mail room with consumable supplies, shipping and receiving duties, and the collection of all recyclable materials.

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What do you like most about working at NOS?

I can walk around the facility and see the work that has been accomplished by me in the last few years. I am also surrounded by a staff that is always friendly and appreciates the work that is accomplished on their behalf.

What is the hardest part of your job?

Responding to short-notice tasks. Because of the broad range of duties associated with my job, it is sometimes hard to provide superior service if a short-notice task pops up.

What is your educational background?

I am a graduate of the Vocational Technical School in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, in the field of carpentry.

What inspired your interest in the ocean and coasts?

The 22 years I spent in the Navy, I guess.

How did you end up working at NOAA?

I heard about the opportunity about the time I had become tired of working in the physical security field. I initially started as a part-time, fill-in person; but I then realized that I enjoyed this type of work, so I applied for a full-time position.

What advice do you have for young people wanting a career in the "ocean realm"?

Talk to people in that field and ask them for assistance in steering your educational needs.

What is the most interesting/important thing you've learned while working at NOAA?

Expect the unexpected.