News Archive

Weekly News: July 2009

Harmful algal bloom

Unprecedented 2009 New England Red Tide Season

New England Red Tide typically occurs every year in the Gulf of Maine and is caused by an algal species called Alexandrium fundyense. Blooms of Alexandrium fundyense are commonly called red tide, but scientists prefer the term harmful algal bloom (HAB) because blooms may have harmful impacts even when the water is not discolored. More...

applying band to osprey

NOS Bands Together to Protect Ospreys

Thirteen staff from the Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management’s Estuarine Reserves Division (ERD) recently got hands-on experience with nesting ospreys when they accompanied naturalist Greg Kearns as he banded some of the season’s newly hatched chicks in the Jug Bay component of the Chesapeake Bay Maryland National Estuarine Research Reserve. More...

girl painting

Uniting Kids Through Art and Science

On June 11, hundreds of children from Washington, DC, descended on the National Mall to learn about the importance of protecting our nation’s watersheds through art. More...

Ten Years Late: A Look Back at the Search for John F. Kennedy, Jr.'s Missing Plane

Ten Years Later: A Look Back at the Search for John F. Kennedy, Jr.'s Missing Plane

Ten years ago, a small plane piloted by the son of former U.S. President John F. Kennedy crashed into the Atlantic Ocean in an accident that drew attention from all around the world. More...

NOS at the Waterkeeper Alliance conference

Building a Foundation for Clean, Healthy Waterways

“Treat the Earth well; it was not given to you by your parents, it was loaned to you by your children.”

These words were delivered by NOS Assistant Administrator John H. Dunnigan at the 11th Annual Waterkeeper Alliance Conference. More...

Coral reef

NOAA Elevates Effectiveness in Addressing Threats to Coral Reefs

The decline and loss of coral reefs has significant social, cultural, economic, and ecological impacts on people and communities in the U.S. and around the world. More...

Gulf Stream current

Historic Current Data Now Available Online

Historic current survey data are now available online, providing users with faster, friendlier, and easier access to historical current information. More...

Retrieving a current meter

NOAA's Air Gap Technology Sends USS New York Down the Mississippi River for Sea Trials

NOAA’s “air gap” technology received the ultimate test on the morning of June 27. The technology passed with flying colors as the new U.S. Navy LPD ship, the USS New York, sailed down the Mississippi River, clearing the underside of the Huey P. Long Bridge just north of downtown New Orleans by 64 centimeters (2.1 feet). More...