News Archive

What's New: October 2013

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Lionfish Tweetchat: November 14

Lionfish, a native Indo-Pacific species, is now found in U.S. Atlantic waters from North Carolina to Florida, in all Gulf of Mexico states, and in the Caribbean, and continues to expand into new regions. Recent estimates of lionfish densities indicate that lionfish have surpassed some native species with the highest estimates reporting over 1,000 lionfish per acre in some locations. To learn more about the lionfish invasion, get your questions ready and tune in for our Lionfish Tweetchat on November 14, 2:00 p.m. ET. More...

Aerial Photos: Post-Sandy and After Restoration

Aerial Photos: Post-Sandy and After Restoration

NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) recently collected imagery and topographic/bathymetric Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data over several New Jersey areas hard-hit by Sandy in 2012. The images will primarily support NOAA nautical chart updates, but will also be used for inundation modeling, coastal zone management and restoration, and as a baseline for future storm impacts and changes in these areas. This latest round of imagery collection follows a series of missions in 2012, during which NGS collected thousands of images of damage along the East Coast immediately following Sandy. More...

NOAA Coast Survey Wants to Hear from Boaters about the Intracoastal Waterway Route

NOAA Coast Survey Wants to Hear from Boaters about the Intracoastal Waterway Route

If you are a recreational boater, fisherman, or another member of the maritime community, NOAA's Office of Coast Survey wants to pick your brain about the "magenta line," which historically depicted the recommended route for the Intracoastal Waterway on NOAA nautical charts. A recent Federal Register Notice outlines NOAA's options for improving the accuracy of the magenta line, which is presently being removed from new editions of nautical charts. More...

NOAA to End Printing Paper Nautical Charts

NOAA to End Printing Paper Nautical Charts

NOAA's Office of Coast Survey, which creates and maintains the nation's suite of a thousand nautical charts of U.S. coastal waters, has announced major changes ahead for mariners and others who use nautical charts. Starting April 13, 2014, the federal government will no longer print traditional lithographic (paper) nautical charts. The decision to stop production is based on several factors: the declining demand for lithographic charts, the increasing use of digital and electronic charts, and federal budget realities. More...

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