Prince William's Oily Mess - A Story of Recovery

NOS Education | Site Map
subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link | subglobal1 link
a. Read Intro | b. Learn the Organisms | c. State Predictions!
a. Observe Mearns Rock | b. Record Data
a. Plot Data | b. View Example Graph
a. Interpret Data & Write Report | b. Share What You Have Learned
subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link | subglobal6 link
subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link | subglobal7 link
subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link | subglobal8 link

Graphing Changes in Marine Life Abundance

NOAA logo


STEP 1c: State Your Predictions!

The next step is to state and write down your prediction(s) about the results you expect once you collect the data.

Predictions are always stated BEFORE seeing your data. Making predictions is usually the first step in a scientific investigation (perhaps your teacher will explain why this is the case). Before you even look at the photos of the quadrats, you should write down at least one prediction. For example, you could make a prediction about the percent cover for each species. Here is an example:

I predict that as time goes on, mussels will come to dominate the percent cover (it will be >50%) because...

After the "because..." you should state WHY you think this predication will be true (this is called the rationale for the prediction).

Don't worry whether your predictions are "true" or "false." You are simply making a statement of expectation based on your hypothesis, which scientists always assume is true (and so should you).

By the way...What is your hypothesis here?



next pageProceed to Step 2a: Observe Mearns Rock



Glossary Express

Hypothesis—an idea or explanation that is based on observations and that can be tested; a suggested explanation for an observation often stated in the form of a question that can be answered by the results of an experiment.

Model
—an abstraction or simplification of a natural phenomenon developed to predict a new phenomenon or to provide insight into existing ones.

Prediction
(or “to predict”)— A scientific model to explain what happens, and why it happens; an indication in advance based on observation, experience, or scientific reason.

(Top)

Revised March 25, 2008 | Questions, Comments? Contact Us | Report Error | Disclaimer | About the Site | User Survey
Web Site Owner: National Ocean Service | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | Department of Commerce | USA.gov
http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/stories/oilymess/working_predict.html