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Meet the Scientists

Meet some of the scientists that provided evidence that lionfish were multiplying in the Atlantic Ocean, and were swimming much deeper in the Atlantic than in their native habitat!

Scott Meister

Scott Meister
Biologist
Marine Resources Research Institute
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

Scott Meister is a fisheries biologist for the Marine Resources Monitoring and Prediction (MARMAP) program, a co-operative between the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and the National Marine Fisheries Service. His research background includes life history studies of black and bank sea bass, as well as the deeper-dwelling wreckfish. Scott also has a great interest in the movement patterns of offshore reef fishes and is currently wrapping up a 5-year mark/recapture study of gag grouper and greater amberjack in the Atlantic. Having been turned on to science at a young age, Scott enjoys working with local schools to promote awareness of the marine environment. Scott has a BA in environmental science from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington.


Joshua K. Loefer

Joshua K. Loefer
Marine Biologist
Marine Resources Research Institute
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

Josh Loefer is a marine biologist with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. On the Island in the Sea expedition, he assisted with cruise logistics, data acquisition, GIS analysis, and sample collection. Josh earned a BA in biology from Furman University in 1996, and an MS in marine biology from the University of Charleston (SC) in 2000. His main research interests include the life history of sharks, snappers, and groupers; satellite telemetry tagging of billfishes and sharks; and the hydrography of the Charleston Bump complex.

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jeremy potter

Jeremy Potter
Sea Grant Fellow
NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration

Jeremy grew up in West Virginia and graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina. Immediately after college, he worked as an observer in Alaska's Bering Sea crab fishery, and later as an instructor at the Wallops Island Marine Science Consortium. In 1997, he spent oa year teaching English in rural Japan. Three years later, he returned home to pursue his interests in international environmental politics, facilitation, and negotiation. Jeremy is a master's student at the Duke University School of the Environment. His current research in international fisheries policy focuses on the Japanese pelagic longline industry. His fascination with the deep sea led him to NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration, where he is a Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Sea Grant Fellow. Jeremy coordinated Web site contributions and assisted with database management for the Islands in the Sea expedition.


Steve W. Ross

Dr. Steve W. Ross
Research Coordinator
North Carolina Coastal Reserve
Principal Investigator, Outer Shelf and Slope Project

Dr. Ross is a native of North Carolina and has spent most of his career involved in the marine sciences of that area. He earned a BS in zoology from Duke University, a master's from UNC-Chapel Hill, and a PhD from NC State University. He has been the research coordinator for the NC Coastal Reserve Program for 12 years. He holds adjunct faculty appointments at North Carolina State University and UNC-Wilmington. His area of specialization is ichthyology (the study of fishes), particularly in areas of ecology and life history (age, growth, feeding, reproduction) studies. He has conducted numerous, diverse projects in estuaries and offshore waters and has served as chief scientist on many cruises, including several using submersibles. On the Islands in the Stream expedition, Dr. Ross and his team assessed the fish communities of several unique deep-water habitats off the southeastern U.S. coast. In particular, they studied energy flow (trophodynamics) and relationships of animals to various habitats, including coral banks, canyons, and rocky areas. The ultimate goal of such studies is to provide information for these poorly known areas that will facilitate management and protection of productive habitats.


Pamela Cox Jutte

Dr. Pamela Cox Jutte
Marine Scientist
Marine Resources Research Institute
South Carolina Department of Natural Resources

Pam Cox Jutte grew up in central Ohio, and developed an interest in marine invertebrates during her undergraduate years at Duke University. After finishing her BS in biology in 1993, she began graduate work at the University of California at Berkeley. Upon the completion of her PhD in 1997, she came to work as a marine scientist for the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Her research projects have focused on the condition of nearshore hard-bottom reefs following ocean disposal, the biological and physical effects of beach nourishment, and habitat quality in tidal creeks and coastal waters. She also serves as adjunct faculty at the College of Charleston's Graduate Program and the Medical University of South Carolina's Marine Biomedicine and Environmental Sciences Program.

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