Web Highlight

Web Highlight

Three visiting scientists from China's State Oceanic Administration (SOA) will spend the next year contributing to NOAA projects while acquiring new skills that they will put to use when they return to their jobs in China. Read our story.

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NOS Communications & Education Division

NOS Assistant Administrator Weekly Newsletter

August 8, 2013



Holly Bamford

Hi everyone,

The work you do every day is vital to our country. In many cases, the impact of National Ocean Service programs extends well beyond the United States. We provide international leadership and benefit from the exchange of ideas in areas as wide-ranging as positioning, marine protected areas, and harmful algal blooms.

To promote the exchange of ideas and science with our counterparts in other countries, NOS hosts about 120 foreign nationals every year. These scientists, researchers, and policy makers come from across the globe to learn from each other and contribute to NOS goals.

This week, a feature on the NOS website  highlights the work of three visiting scientists from China.

I encourage you to get to know our visiting international colleagues. 

Thank you,

Holly A. Bamford, Ph.D.
Assistant Administrator
National Ocean Service

Web Highlight

Web Highlight

Three visiting scientists from China's State Oceanic Administration (SOA) will spend the next year contributing to NOAA projects while acquiring new skills that they will put to use when they return to their jobs in China. Their one-year fellowships to NOAA come under the auspices of the U.S.-China Protocol on Marine and Fisheries Science and Technology, a program of the U.S. State Department. Read our story.

NOS For Employees website

For Employees

Do you know where you can find links to Web Time & Attendance, the NFC Employee Personal Page, and your electronic personnel folder, all in the same place? Check out the home page of your For Employees site. Look at the left column for helpful links.

Around NOS

Wounded Veterans, Youth Divers Join Florida Keys Reef Restoration Efforts (ONMS)

Coral reefs within Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary were recently bolstered by the efforts of some special volunteers. Divers with the Combat Wounded Veteran Challenge and SCUBAnauts International joined scientists at Mote Marine Laboratory on July 29 for a two-day project to help tend corals in sanctuary-permitted underwater nurseries as part of an ongoing reef restoration effort. For this effort, eight combat wounded veterans, 20 young SCUBAnauts, and two "snorkelnauts" helped Mote scientists hang small coral clippings on underwater structures, dubbed "trees," where the corals grow rapidly. Participating combat wounded veterans included amputees who are able to dive using specialized waterproof prosthetics, veterans with traumatic brain injuries, and a double lung transplant recipient. For more information, contact Karrie Carnes.

New Report Highlights Extent of Climate Impacts to Estuaries (OCRM)

A new research report, "Climate Sensitivity of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System," was released this week. This is the first study of the social and biophysical impacts of climate change to the nation's estuarine research reserves. Researchers determined the extent of relative climate sensitivity in the 28 reserves by looking at five factors: social, biophysical, and ecological sensitivity; and exposure to temperature change and sea level rise. The study, funded by NOAA's Climate Program Office, was conducted by a collaborative, interdisciplinary team of investigators from the University of Wisconsin, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, and Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management working with staff from across the National Estuarine Research Reserve System. For more information, contact Dwight Trueblood

New Land Cover Data Available for Wells Reserve in Southern Maine (CSC)

High-resolution land cover data for the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve watershed in southern Maine are now available. The 2012 data provide detailed information about land cover features such as impervious surfaces, cultivated lands, and critical habitats such as forests and emergent wetlands. The reserve is particularly interested in using the data to create a detailed habitat map. The NOAA Coastal Services Center's Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP) developed the data in conjunction with the reserve. For more information, contact Nate Herold.

Fishing for Energy Facility Surpasses 300,000 Pound Derelict Fishing Gear Milestone (OR&R)

On July 29, Fishing for Energy, the innovative public-private partnership that provides commercial fisherman a cost-free way to recycle old and unusable fishing gear, celebrated a significant milestone at Covanta Energy in Haverhill, Mass., surpassing 300,000 pounds of total derelict fishing gear processed at the Energy-from-Waste facility. Fishing for Energy thrives due to extensive cooperation between government, private, public, and local organizations. This diversity of partnerships results in a unique, community-focused program that addresses a marine environmental issue, reduces costs for small commercial fishing businesses, recycles metal, and recovers energy from the remaining material. For more information, contact Nancy Wallace.

Gulf of Mexico Dolphin Health Assessment (OR&R, NCCOS)

Over 60 veterinarians, clinicians, handlers, and biologists worked in Mississippi and Alabama waters from July 22-Aug. 2 to assess the health condition of bottlenose dolphins following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. The team captured, assessed, and then released 20 dolphins during the two-week period, and deployed satellite-linked transmitters on 19 of the dolphins to monitor their movements over time. Results from the health assessments, together with analyses of ongoing population abundance, stock structure, survivorship, reproductive success, and findings from the ongoing Unusual Mortality Event in the northern Gulf of Mexico will be used to support the natural resource damage assessment currently underway. For more information, contact Laurie Sullivan.

NOAA, Partners Conduct Field Mission to Investigate Coastal Contaminants (NCCOS, OCRM)

In July, scientists from the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science conducted a follow-up field mission in the St. Thomas East End Reserves (STEER) in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The mission was funded by and carried out in partnership with NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program. The research responds to local regional manager requests for an integrated ecosystem assessment of the STEER following results from an earlier contaminant assessment. During this assessment, researchers found elevated levels of tributyltin (TBT, a boat hull antifouling ingredient) and copper in sediments within the STEER. Since TBT has been banned on most boats in the U.S. since 1989, this mission focused on assessing the extent of TBT and copper contamination in the sediments, and to evaluate the levels of these contaminants over time. For more information, contact Tony Pait.

Conductivity-Temperature Sensor Added to Cordova NWLON Station (CO-OPS, IOOS®)

The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) recently integrated a conductivity-temperature sensor at the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON) station in Cordova, Alaska. The Prince William Sound Science Center and CO-OPS installed and integrated the sensor, with funding from the Alaska Ocean Observing System, a regional member of the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. The sensor allows scientists to better understand the influence of freshwater runoff on oil spill modeling. Conductivity data from the sensor is now being recorded and transmitted real-time via the NWLON and is being ingested and disseminated via the CO-OPS database.  For more information, contact Robert Heitsenrether.

New LIDAR File Format Now Supports Topographic-Bathymetric Data (NGS)

Thanks to an initiative spearheaded by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), the most widely used publicly available Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) file format now supports topographic-bathymetric LIDAR data. The American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing recently released this new domain profile for topographic-bathymetric LIDAR. NGS plans to use the new format for coastal LIDAR data to be acquired in the region impacted by Hurricane Sandy. For more information, contact Chris Parrish.

NOAA Leads Webinar With Re-Insurance Industry Executives (OCS, NGS, CO-OPS, IOOS®)

Staff from the Office of Coast Survey, National Geodetic Survey, the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, and the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System recently led a 90-minute webinar discussion with an estimated 75 members and staff of the Re-Insurance Association of America. The office directors and technical experts demonstrated how NOAA navigation, observation, and geospatial tools and data can be used to improve flood modeling and post-storm assessments. NOAA representatives also learned about the re-insurance industry's emerging challenges to help improve products to meet their needs in the face of climate change and extreme weather events. For more information, contact Gary Magnuson.

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