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Trips to the beach aren't always fun in the sun! Check out our list of nine common dangers you may face while visiting the beach this summer.

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For Employees

Nominations are now being accepted for this year's NOS Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Diversity Award. The deadline is July 22, 2013.

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NOS Communications & Education Division

NOS Assistant Administrator Weekly Newsletter

July 11, 2013



Holly Bamford

Hi everyone,

By industry estimates, more than 20 percent of all the content viewed on websites is being accessed via mobile devices such as a smartphones or tablet computers. More than half of all American adults now have a smartphone and more than a third own a tablet computer.

National Ocean Service programs are at the forefront of providing information in a mobile-friendly format. Here are two recent examples.

In May, the Office of Coast Survey released MyNOAACharts, an Android tablet application that allows users to download NOAA nautical charts and editions of the U.S. Coast Pilot. Coast Survey will test MyNOAACharts throughout the summer. The application, which can be used on land and on the water, lets users find their positions on a NOAA nautical chart.

Last month, the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and NOAA Coastal Services Center, working with the State of Hawaii and Friends of Ka'ena, developed the Ka'ena Point Guide, for Android and iPhone/iPad devices. This application was created for visitors, recreational enthusiasts, students, and local residents. It shows historical sites, ecological characteristics, and trail information for Oahu's Ka'ena Point.

There are even more ocean- and coastal-related mobile sites and applications described on the NOS website. Congratulations to all of the to NOS programs for their forethought and creativity in making information available in these formats.

Thank you,
Holly

Holly A. Bamford, Ph.D.
Assistant Administrator
National Ocean Service

Web Highlight

Web Highlight

Trips to the beach aren't always fun in the sun! Check out our list of nine common dangers you may face while visiting the beach this summer.

NOS For Employees website

For Employees

Nominations are now being accepted for this year's NOS Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Diversity Award. The deadline is July 22, 2013.

Around NOS

NCCOS and Partners Announce a Significant 2013 Harmful Algal Bloom Season for Lake Erie (NCCOS)

On July 2, the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), in partnership with
Heidelberg University and Ohio State University's Sea Grant Program, unveiled NOAA's second seasonal harmful algal bloom (HAB) prediction for Lake Erie. The press event, field demonstration, and webinar were hosted by Ohio State University's Stone Laboratory and attended by various stakeholders including recreational fishing and tourism associations, water treatment and natural resource managers, state legislators, and members of Congress. The predicted bloom is expected to be larger than last year, but considerably less than the record-setting 2011 bloom. The HAB season generally runs from June to the end of October, with maximum biomass generally occurring in September. Due to variability of bloom intensity and location, NOAA researchers advised local and regional managers to register for NOAA's weekly Lake Erie HAB forecast system for the most timely bloom information. For more information, contact Richard Stumpf or Timothy Wynne.

Louisiana Public Broadcasting Films Dolphin Survey in Gulf of Mexico (OR&R, NCCOS)

On June 27, Louisiana Public Broadcasting participated in field sampling as part of the bottlenose dolphin health assessment project in Barataria Bay, La., to understand impacts from the Deepwater Horizon (Mississippi Canyon 252) Oil Spill. The media material will be included in a six-part documentary on Louisiana wildlife to air in 2014. The sampling event is a partnership between the Office of Response and Restoration, the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, NOAA Fisheries Protected Resources, state of Louisiana, the Chicago Zoological Society, and the National Marine Mammal Foundation. The project is evaluating sublethal, chronic, and indirect health impacts of the DWH oil spill by comparing datasets from long-term health monitoring of coastal dolphins inhabiting Sarasota Bay, Florida, a region of the Gulf that was not exposed to MC252 oil, with present field data. There is also an ongoing marine mammal Unusual Mortality Event in the northern Gulf of Mexico. For more information, contact Lori Schwacke or Tom Brosnan.

Popular Series of Social Science Publications Goes Mobile (CSC)

A series of popular publications by the NOAA Coastal Services Center is now available in the ePub format for tablets and mobile devices. The growing "Social Science Tools for Coastal Programs" series includes ten titles, each focused on a different method or topic. The series was developed to help coastal managers use social science tools in their field of work because some of the most challenging decisions in coastal management stem from the relationship between people and the environment. For more information, contact Tricia Ryan.

NOAA Engages Great Lakes Community at Soo Locks Engineer's Day (CO-OPS, CSC, ONMS)

The Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services partnered with the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) to attend the annual U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Engineering Day in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Over 6,500 people explored the Soo Locks, walked across the Lock walls, and learned how commercial and recreational ships navigate to the region. These walls make it possible for freighters to traverse the 21-foot drop between Lake Superior and the lower Great Lakes. The Soo Locks Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System, incorporating data from seven water level stations, provides critical navigation information to USACE and the local economy. Staff from the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary supported the event by educating residents on the shipwrecks found in Thunder Bay, Mich., and the NOAA Coastal Services Center provided coastal management materials. For more information, contact Linda Austin.

NERRS Detect Meteo-Tsunami on East Coast (OCRM)

The National Estuarine Research Reserve System's (NERRS) System-wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) water level gauges were among the first instruments to detect an unusual coastal event on June 13, described by the National Weather Service as a series of "tsunami-like waves." The waves created a signal that traveled along the east coast, at least as far north as Maine and as far south as Puerto Rico. After the waves "ran aground" on the northeast and mid-Atlantic coast they were recorded by SWMP water level gauges at six NERRs; Wells, Maine; Waquoit Bay, Mass.; Narragansett, R.I.; Jacques Cousteau NERR, N.J.; Delaware NERR; and  the Chesapeake Bay  NERR, Va. This data collected by the SWMP illustrates how the national network of reserves can serve as a sentinel observing system for U.S. coastal waters by providing a twenty year dataset, along with a real-time record of events. For more information, contact Marie Bundy.

Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit at Sanctuary Visitor Center (ONMS)

On June 1, the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary (TBNMS) visitor center opened Journey Stories, a traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution that examines the ways transportation and increased mobility has shaped American History. In order to broaden visitors'
Journey Stories experience, TBNMS partnered with several community organizations to provide complementary programming for the public. Through these partnerships the community of Alpena has enjoyed a range of events and programs centered on the Smithsonian exhibit.  Traveling exhibits, such as Journey Stories, offer an opportunity for local partnerships with other educational and cultural institutions. This collaboration also provides an opportunity for the sanctuary to recruit new volunteers. For more information, contact Sarah Waters.

Updated Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) Framework Document Presented (IOOS)

The Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) Steering Committee recently presented an updated framework document to its administrative body, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The document, GOOS Regional Alliance Policy 2013, provides a vision and framework for the roles and responsibilities of the GOOS Regional Alliances and the terms of reference of the GOOS Regional Council. As the current chair of the GOOS Regional Council, the NOAA-led U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS®) helped draft the document at the GOOS Regional Forum last month. If the IOC has no objections, the document will be adopted as a governance document for the GOOS. For more information, contact Laura Griesbauer.

NGS Plays Key Role in Esri International User Conference and Survey Summit (NGS)

NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) played a critical role as a leader in the geospatial community through its efforts in improving both the quality and accessibility of the National Spatial Reference System. At the 2013 Esri International User Conference in San Diego, Calif., July 8 to 12, NGS led discussions on the fundamental aspects of geodesy and positioning and the latest GIS developments, with representative experts providing training and knowledge on NGS products and services. GIS professionals in the surveying and engineering fields also gathered at the same location for the Esri Survey Summit (July 6-9), which provided more in-depth coverage about the collection, management, and uses of high-accuracy geospatial data. For more information, contact Michael Dennis or Brian Shaw.

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