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Ports, piers, and harbors! Have you visited our image gallery lately? We've added some new photos of some coastal cities around the nation to the Navigation and Commerce category.

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For Employees

Nominations are now being accepted for this year's NOS Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Diversity Award. The deadline is July 22, 2013.

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NOS Communications & Education Division

NOS Assistant Administrator Weekly Newsletter

June 27, 2013



Holly Bamford

Hi everyone,

First, I would like to thank all who made last week's World Hydrography Day events in Silver Spring and off the coast of New Jersey such as success. I'm sorry that I was not able to attend in person. Dr. Callender relayed that the ceremony in Silver Spring was poignant, solemn, and a fitting commemoration for the 20 crewmen lost on the U.S. Coast Survey Steamer Robert J. Walker more than 150 years ago. In addition, crew of the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson laid a memorial wreath on the waters above the area where the sunken wreck is thought to have laid to rest. The Office of Coast Survey, National Geodetic Survey and Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, along with the Office of Marine and Aviation Operations and the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey Historical Society, made the events such a success. More details, including photos from the day are available here.

Second, you may recall that I talked about NOS's important role in the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States Act of 2012 (RESTORE Act) a few months back. I'm pleased to share with you a new website dedicated to the NOAA RESTORE Act Science Program, http://restoreactscienceprogram.noaa.gov/. The goal of the Science Program is to achieve an integrative, holistic understanding of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem and support—to the maximum extent practicable—restoration efforts and the long-term sustainability of the ecosystem, including its fish stocks, habitats, wildlife, and fishing industries.  The website provides information about the program, goals, guiding principles and focus areas which shape the draft Science Plan Framework. Much appreciation goes to the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science for their role in the technical development of the site.

Thank you,
Holly

Holly A. Bamford, Ph.D.
Assistant Administrator
National Ocean Service

Web Highlight

Web Highlight

Ports, piers, and harbors! Visited our image gallery lately? We've added some new photos to our Navigation and Commerce category of some coastal cities around the nation.

NOS For Employees website

For Employees

Nominations are now being accepted for this year's NOS Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Diversity Award. The deadline is July 22, 2013.

Around NOS

NOAA leads Tribal Oil Spill Training in State of Washington (OR&R)

Last week, Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) staff taught "2013 Washington Outer Coast Tribal Oil Spill Training" classes at three different Indian nations along the Washington coast. The classes took place at the Makah, Quileute, and Quinault nations. Members and employees of the nations, members of the Hoh tribe, and local oil spill response organizations attended. Besides OR&R staff, other instructors included experts from the U.S Coats Guard, Washington Department of Ecology, Marine Spill Response Corporation, the National Response Corporation, and ExxonMobil. Topics ranged from oil chemistry, to OR&R tools, to dispersants and in-situ burning. Other topics covered responder health and safety, shoreline cleanup techniques and state response trailers located at each nation. For more information, contact LTJG Alice Drury.

Documents Mark Milestone in Delivery of High Quality Ocean Observations (IOOS®)

This week, the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) published the second and third in a series of quality control procedure manuals addressing one or more of 26 oceanographic variables identified by IOOS as required to detect and/or predict changes in phenomena of interest to user groups. The newest manuals focus on waves and currents and detail best practices for quality control tests of measurements from commonly used sensors in all coastal regions, including the Great Lakes. The first manual, published last winter, focused on dissolved oxygen. Each document is designed to improve the overall quality and reliability of coastal monitoring data, which in turn enhance accuracy of tools, models, and forecasts that inform decisions concerning public safety, our economy, and the marine environment. For more information, contact Ray Toll.

Virtual Coastal GeoTools Provides New Forum for Innovative Ideas (CSC)

More than 170 participants connected to the first-ever Virtual Coastal GeoTools conference broadcast over three afternoons in June. Sessions focused on ocean planning, data applications and management, and coastal hazards. This virtual conference was organized to capitalize on the work that had gone into planning for Coastal GeoTools 2013 before budget sequestration forced its cancellation. About one-third of the presentations planned for the conference in March were offered during the virtual event. Local and state agencies, nonprofit organizations, private sector firms, and other federal agencies attended the interactive sessions. Session recordings will be available soon online. For more information, contact Stephanie Robinson.

Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Trains Divers in Safe Lionfish Capture

Last week, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) Education and Outreach staff presented a Lionfish Collection and Permit Workshop at the Florida Keys Eco-Discovery Center in Key West. Forty-four people attended the lecture, including representatives from PADI, the Boy Scout's Sea Base, and staff from three dive operators. These workshops are intended for concerned dive professionals and avid recreational divers interested in obtaining a permit to collect lionfish with hand nets from the "no-take" Sanctuary Preservation Areas (SPAs). These workshops are sponsored by REEF and the FKNMS and cover the progression of the invasion, an overview of lionfish biology and ecology, safe handling and collection techniques, and first aid. More than 570 individuals have received FKNMS permits to remove lionfish from SPAs. For more information, contact Todd Hitchins.

New Guide Now Available for Siting Offshore Wind Projects (OCRM)

The National Coastal Zone Management Program recently helped fund a new publication, a "Guide to State Management of Offshore Wind Energy in the Mid-Atlantic Region." Developed by the Environmental Law Institute for the Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean, the guide provides useful information for offshore wind project developers. The guide offers a summary of the key authorities the Mid-Atlantic States may apply to for siting offshore energy projects, as well as an overview of the necessary information the states will need to review these projects. Also featured is a description of the role of the states in reviewing offshore wind projects under the authority provided them through the federal consistency requirements of the Coastal Zone Management Act. For more information, contact John Kuriawa.

Summer Gravity Surveying Efforts to Focus on Hurricane Sandy Impact Areas of the Northeast (NGS)

To improve the determination of heights for a multitude of applications, including floodplain mapping and risk management for coastal communities from tsunamis, hurricanes, and storm surges, the National Geodetic Survey's Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) program recently began collecting gravity survey data covering the entire east coast from Maine to North Carolina and through the Great Lakes. In Maine, the survey will be conducted on the Naval Research Laboratory's King Air aircraft. The rest of the east coast work, funded through the Sandy Supplemental, will cover New Hampshire, New York, New Jersey, and most of North Carolina. Contractor Fugro EarthData will complete this segment. For more information, contact Monica Youngman.

Contaminant Data Informs Proposed University Medical Program on Human Health (NCCOS)

A new proposed program at the University of Miami School of Medicine titled, "Superfund Program in Interdisciplinary Research and Integrated Training (SPIRIT)," heavily relies on data from a recent National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) contaminant assessment in Guanica Bay, Puerto Rico, which found extremely high levels of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) in the marine surface sediments of areas throughout this bay. NCCOS participated in the first meeting of the scientific advisory board of the new research program exploring the effects of environmental exposure to PCBs on the human digestive system. This human health connection shows the versatility of NCCOS's contaminant data in its application for answering a variety of novel questions related to human health and the environment. The final decision to move this program forward will be made later this year. For more information, contact David Whitall.

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