Web Highlight

Web Highlight

Tune into our latest Diving Deeper podcast for a conversation with Rear Admiral Gerd Glang as we discuss World Hydrography Day (June 21), some history on NOAA's Office of Coast Survey, and the tragic sinking of the Coast Survey vessel Robert J. Walker.

NOS For Employees website

For Employees

Check out your For Employees home page for information on an upcoming NOAA event to honor 20 crew members who lost their lives when the U.S. Coast Survey Steamer Robert J. Walker sank on June 21, 1860.

Facebook podcasts Feeds Twitter Flickr Youtube

Questions or comments about this newsletter? Send us an email
NOS Communications & Education Division

NOS Assistant Administrator Weekly Newsletter

June 20, 2013

The Office of Coast Survey ensures safe, efficient, and environmentally sound marine transportation. In celebration of World Hydrography Day tomorrow, I've asked Admiral Gerd Glang to guest write this week. He discusses a commemoration that is 153 years in the making.

Thanks,
Holly



Gerd Glang

Hi everyone,

Tomorrow is World Hydrography Day. Usually, national hydrographic offices — like the Office of Coast Survey — issue a press release, describing how hydrography and nautical charts contribute to safe navigation and reliable maritime commerce. This year, however, the day is more special.

Tomorrow, for the first time in 153 years, we will honor 20 crew members who lost their lives when the U.S. Coast Survey steamer Robert J. Walker went down in 1860. As a colleague observed, rightly, "these are our guys."

We invite all staff members in the Washington, D.C., area to join us on World Hydrography Day, when we will honor the contributions and sacrifice of "our guys." We will hold a short ceremony tomorrow, in the NOAA Science Center. Doors open at 9:30 am, and the ceremony starts at 10:00.

The story of the Walker continues today. In the coming days, NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson will survey the possible remains of the wreck, and then the National Marine Sanctuaries' Maritime Heritage program will send down divers to hopefully make a positive identification. You will hear more about this at tomorrow's World Hydrography Day event.

This year's World Hydrography Day at NOAA shows us how even pre-Civil War hydrographers have been positioning America for its future as a vibrant maritime nation. It is a task that never ends.

RDML Gerd Glang
Director, Office of Coast Survey

Web Highlight

Web Highlight

Tune into our latest Diving Deeper podcast for a conversation with Rear Admiral Gerd Glang as we discuss World Hydrography Day (June 21), some history on NOAA's Office of Coast Survey, and the tragic sinking of the Coast Survey vessel Robert J. Walker.

NOS For Employees website

For Employees

Check out your For Employees home page for information on an upcoming NOAA event to honor 20 crew members who lost their lives when the U.S. Coast Survey Steamer Robert J. Walker sank on June 21, 1860.

Around NOS

"Nerdy Economist" Returns in New Episode of Animated Video Series (CSC)

The NOAA Coastal Services Center's Econ 120 animated video series explains crucial economic principles in everyday terms and shows how these principles relate to the important decisions faced by those who manage the resources of the coasts and oceans. The newest episode, featuring the series' likable nerdy economist, covers economic indicators, explaining how numbers on jobs, wages, and gross domestic product can be used to describe the health of the economy. Linked to YouTube, this growing collection of short videos is designed to show that, behind all the stuffy language, economic concepts are really pretty simple. For more information, contact Jeffery Adkins.

Strategy to Reduce Land-Based Debris in the Great Lakes (OR&R)

Land-based debris is often characterized as everyday, general litter items and is one of the more prevalent debris forms in the Great Lakes. Last month, the Marine Debris Program, the Alliance for the Great Lakes, Old Woman Creek National Estuary Research Reserve, and the City of Cleveland hosted a workshop to address land-based debris in the Great Lakes. The goal was to create a strategic plan addressing land-based debris.  This work will continue to evolve and lead to the drafting of the first Great Lakes regional action plan to address debris. For more information, contact Sarah Opfer.

Interagency Mission Maps Shipwreck Northwest of Key West (ONMS)

On June 12, the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (FKNMS) led a multi-agency effort to map the WWII shipwreck Joseph M. Cudahy, one of 87 vessels identified through the Remediation of Underwater Legacy Environmental Threats project. The shipwreck is leaking pollutants and posing a significant pollution threat. The survey of the Cudahy will assist in determining the vessel's condition and provide information to the U.S. Coast Guard and the Florida Keys Area Committee to assist in developing a response plan for the vessel should a large discharge of pollutants occur. Federal and state agency staff aboard the FKNMS P/V Peter Gladding used an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle with side scan sonar to perform a hydrographic survey of the wreck which is located approximately 60 miles northwest of Key West, 15 miles north of FKNMS boundaries. This joint effort included NOAA's National Weather Service, the Office of Coast Survey, the Office of Habitat Conservation, Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, and the Coast Guard. For more information, contact Stephen Werndli.

 

Meteorological Data Archives at National Oceanographic Data Center (CO-OPS)

Enhancing the existing partnership between the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) and the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), CO-OPS quality-controlled meteorological data (wind speed/direction/gust, water and air temperature, and barometric pressure) are now being archived by the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).  NDBC retrieves the CO-OPS data, performs automated quality control checks, and packages monthly data for by NODC archives. For more information, contact Kathleen Bailey.

Michigan Coastal Management Program Supports Water Trails and Tourism (OCRM)

In June 17, 2013, the Michigan Coastal Management Program announced awarding over $340,000 in grants to 10 local communities, nonprofit organizations, and universities for projects to plan, develop, and promote local, regional, or statewide coastal water trails along the Great Lakes. For example, with its grant, the Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy Tourism will work with local governments, chambers of commerce, business leaders, and local paddling groups to plan, map, and market a non-motorized water trail along East Grand Traverse Bay. Tourism and recreation are an important economic and employment sector for the state. The water trail grants, supported through the National Coastal Zone Management Program, will help enhance and further promote coastal tourism opportunities along Michigan's shoreline. For more information, contact Josh Lott.

New U.S. Coast Pilot for Alaska Hits the Shelves (OCS)

A new edition of Coast Pilot 8 for Alaska was published in late May. This 35th Edition is available as a PDF for free download from the Coast Survey website. For recreational boaters and commercial mariners who prefer a printed, bound copy, the edition is also available. For more information, contact Thomas Loeper.

IOOS Contributes at Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance Conference (IOOS®)

The U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) is gaining recognition as a contributor to enhancing our nation's ability to guard against security threats. On June 11, IOOS delivered a 35 minute briefing of the unique capabilities of IOOS to an audience representing the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security. IOOS' framework of 17 federal agency partners and 11 regions is poised to do more in helping the military evaluate threats against our citizens and country. One of the key IOOS observing assets is its array of high frequency radars that measure surface current speed and direction in near real-time and in all types of weather. Recently, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security funded a project to study the utility of high frequency radar systems in tracking vessels of interest.  For more information, contact Suzanne Skelley.

Evaluating Sensors Operating on the Coast (NGS)

As part of its ongoing investigation of new airborne remote sensing technologies for NOAA's Coastal Mapping Program and to support other Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping applications, the National Geodetic Survey is conducting a multi-wavelength Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) evaluation project aboard NOAA aircraft beginning the week of June 17. Three different airborne LIDAR systems are being tested simultaneously for the first time. The project is supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Geological Survey. For more information, contact Nicole Cabana.

NCCOS and Partners Issue 2013 Dead Zone Predictions for Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay (NCCOS)

On June 18, NOAA and partners issued the 2013 'dead zone' predictions for two of the nation's most hypoxia-impacted bodies of water: the Gulf of Mexico and the Chesapeake Bay. The Gulf of Mexico hypoxic dead zone is predicted to be large this year, with an area ranging from 7,286 to 8,651 square miles, an area comparable to the size of New Jersey. In contrast, the Chesapeake Bay forecast calls for a smaller than average hypoxic dead zone, below the historical averages for hypoxic and anoxic volumes in the Bay. These forecasts are driven largely by springtime nutrient loading estimates provided by the US Geological Survey. The predictions for a large Gulf dead zone reflect flood conditions in parts of the Midwest that caused large amounts of nutrients to be transported from the Mississippi River watershed to the Gulf. For more information, contact David Kidwell or Alan Lewitus.

Facebook podcasts Feeds Twitter Flickr Youtube

NOS 'For Employees' Site

Past Issues
NOS Communications & Education Division
Questions? Send us an email